News

Voter guide: Sheriff Carlos Bolanos says as incumbent he's the 'most qualified person' for the job

Sheriff Carlos Bolanos is running for reelection on June 7 against Sheriff's Capt. Christina Corpus. Courtesy Carlos Bolanos for Sheriff campaign.

Growing up a first-generation American in San Francisco, Carlos Bolanos knew he would have to carve his own path.

"My parents immigrated from Nicaragua," he said. "They didn't know anything about SATs or anything of that sort. So I kind of had to figure it out on my own."

Only in his senior year of high school, when he started feeling the pressure and expectations of adulthood, did Bolanos consider a career in law enforcement. He liked the idea of working in the field, and the excitement of the job appealed to him. And, as he said, "I thought law enforcement would be an honorable profession where I can make a difference."

Now, more than 40 years later, he's in the midst of his first reelection campaign for San Mateo County Sheriff, a position he's held for almost six years. In a contentious race against Sheriff's Capt. Christina Corpus, Bolanos is running a campaign that emphasizes his extensive law enforcement experience and his accomplishments as the incumbent sheriff.

Yet, when given the opportunity, Bolanos has taken jabs at his opponent.

Help sustain the local news you depend on.

Your contribution matters. Become a member today.

Join

When a news article outed Corpus' husband for having a tattoo of a confederate flag, Bolanos criticized her in an Instagram post.

"It is frankly shocking that Christina Corpus would try to pretend that the Confederate flag has another meaning than exactly what it is - a sign of racism and white supremacy," Bolanos said in his post. "It's less surprising that she would try to cast blame on others in light of this revelation."

Corpus dismissed the claim and described it as "mudslinging" and a distraction from the larger issues.

"It's a smear campaign," she said. "Why aren't people asking the sheriff about things that have happened under his leadership?"

Bolanos's platform is centered around what he calls "public safety first for all," which he hopes to achieve by strengthening community relationships and transparency, upgrading policing technology, reducing recidivism and prioritizing officer wellness.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox in our Express newsletter.

Describing himself as "the most qualified person to continue to lead the Sheriff's Office," Bolanos said that he has "extensive experience not only in leading law enforcement agencies and keeping our communities safe, but also in building relationships with the communities that we serve.

"I am running for reelection because I want to continue the outstanding work my people are doing," he said.

Path to policing

Becoming sheriff was never a goal of Bolanos's.

After setting his sights on law enforcement, he completed a two-year degree in criminology at City College, before going on to earn his bachelor's in economics from the University of San Francisco and ultimately his master's in public administration from California State University, East Bay.

Then, in the late '70s, as a green patrol officer with the Palo Alto Police Department, he began to dream of rising to the ranks of police chief. At the department, he served as a detective, sergeant and lieutenant, before accepting the role of police captain for the City of Salinas in 1991.

Three years later, at the age of 35, he fulfilled his ambition when he was appointed police chief for the Redwood City Police Department. As chief, a position that he held for 12 years until becoming San Mateo County undersheriff in 2007, Bolanos established the local Police Athletic League (now Police Activities League or PAL) as a way to keep kids out of trouble by engaging them in sports instead. What started as a small operation in a downtown storefront soon grew to include summer camps, field trips and cultural events. Redwood City's PAL, which turned 25 in 2019 and will officially mark the occasion in May, has served a total of 15,000 children and youth so far, mainly in the Latinx community, according to the organization's website.

In 2016, then-Sheriff Greg Munks announced his early retirement, cutting his four-year term short by two years. Facing an imminently vacant sheriff's position, the County Board of Supervisors was tasked with deciding how to proceed, either by appointing then-Undersheriff Bolanos or by opening the process to other candidates through election or appointment. In a letter to the board, representatives Anna Eshoo and Jackie Speier advocated for the latter, recommending "a decision making process that is absent a perception of a pre-ordained outcome."

Ultimately Bolanos was appointed in a 3-2 vote, with Supervisors Dave Pine and Carole Groom dissenting. He was officially elected in 2018 with just over 60% of the vote.

Since then, Bolanos has helped expand the Sheriff's Activities League (SAL), most notably in the opening of a new 2,000-square foot space in Half Moon Bay in December 2021. He has also created new programming for inmates of county correctional facilities, including launching an Acute Stabilization Unit for those experiencing severe mental health issues, opening a Maple Street Correctional Center Family Reunification Unit to help reconnect inmates with their loved ones and implementing video services for remote visitation.

"One of the differences between a sheriff's office and a police department is, of course, we run the correctional facilities," Bolanos said. "And I think it's critical that we do everything we can for the people that are in our care and custody, to make them better when they come out than when they came in."

Bolanos also champions a community policing philosophy, which he said is best demonstrated through the department's engagement efforts, including hosting "coffee with a deputy," "shop with a cop," food and clothing drives, as well as continuing the Community Alliance to Revitalize Our Neighborhoods (CARON) program to serve residents of North Fair Oaks and unincorporated coastal regions. He also launched the Asian American Pacific Islander Liaison Program with Millbrae Deputy Jimmy Chung to address safety concerns among, and prevent hate crimes against the AAPI community.

One of his main goals, he said, is "working in partnership and collaboration with the community that we serve to make sure that their needs are getting met and that we're listening to them."

One of the best examples of this approach, he added, was his decision to end release transfer requests to the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Until November 2021, Bolanos collaborated with ICE by voluntarily transferring former inmates to immigration custody, a practice permitted but not required by Senate Bill 54, the California Values Act, and highly criticized by local advocates. In 2020, the Sheriff's Office reported they released 15 immigrants to ICE, which accounted for 62% of all Bay Area transfers and more than any other individual county.

"One of the things I have done to increase trust between my office and the community is end all cooperation with ICE. I listened to the community, I heard their concerns and I acted," Bolanos told the Pulse.

Opponents have noted that Bolanos could, at any time, reverse his decision. When asked if that's something he would consider, he said that he doesn't intend to cooperate with ICE in the future.

"It's a final decision unless something dramatically changes," he said. However, he added that he agreed with the nature of the law and was "still concerned about serious and violent criminals being released back to the community."

Keeping the county safe

The past few years have marked a significant shift in public perception of law enforcement, something Bolanos is well aware of.

In light of heightened awareness of police brutality as well as growing movements to defund the police, law enforcement officers nationwide are being forced to reckon with their role and image in the public.

Bolanos said he intends to "address that shift by responding to the community's needs and being as transparent as possible." To that end, he said he has updated the department's Use of Force policy, created a Transparency Portal and hosted community events.

"I am also open to creating a community oversight committee that will be able to provide input on how my office can continue to build positive relationships with the communities we serve," he said.

The Sheriff's Office amended its Use of Force policy in the wake of public outcry surrounding three fatal incidents during the year prior.

Following the October 2018 killing of Chinedu Valentine Okobi, a 36-year-old Black man who was stopped by sheriff's deputies while walking in Millbrae and died after being Tasered, beaten and pepper sprayed, the sheriff's office—at the request of the Board of Supervisors—participated in a study session on Tasers and use of force. The sheriff's office presented a revised policy, which incorporated recommendations from the American Civil Liberties Union and emphasized communication and deescalation, implicit bias training and expansion of the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team. The ACLU, which reviewed the draft policy, wrote in a letter to county officials that some aspects of the policy didn't go far enough, adding that the policy includes language that could soon be outdated, permitting deadly force when a deputy "reasonably believes the suspect poses an imminent threat."

"There is never any room for excessive force," said Bolanos, adding that he was always taught to use the least force possible. Still, he added, "It is the job, where, unfortunately, sometimes force must be used. It's not a pleasant thing for a law enforcement officer. You know, we're human beings too, and it can be quite scary and stressful."

Bolanos acknowledged that public trust in law enforcement has been shaken in recent years and said that part of his responsibility as sheriff is to rebuild those relationships.

"As a law enforcement professional, I have to be open and willing to have those discussions with the various groups and members of the community," he said. Bolanos said he looked forward to sitting down with Fixin' San Mateo County, a local organization working to create civilian oversight of the sheriff's office and establish a county inspector general, to discuss ways of increasing transparency and bringing in new perspectives.

Though he welcomed their input, he added, "I don't really like the term oversight because I think it's misleading for everybody. I don't see a model where a group of residents is going to tell me necessarily what to do."

Touting San Mateo County as "one of the safest counties in the state," Bolanos said that ultimately his number one priority is to coordinate with all of the county's police and criminal justice departments to keep the residents and the peace officers safe.

The pandemic, in concert with rising housing costs in the county, non-competitive salaries/benefits and growing social justice movements, have resulted in more people leaving than entering law enforcement, he said. To address officer fatigue and turnover, Bolanos wants to look into better childcare options, more housing assistance and programs that divert public mental health calls to specialists instead of officers. He also plans to implement the third cycle of what he called "an improved mental health/emotional well-being system" focused specifically on helping officers cope with the stress of "the pandemic, civil unrest, low staffing levels," among other things.

"I'm hoping that people realize that law enforcement is absolutely an honorable profession," he said. "And that we get those candidates coming through the door again."

Bolanos and Corpus were set to face off at a candidate forum on May 12 but Bolanos pulled out.

San Mateo County's next sheriff will be determined by voters during the June 7 election.

Read the voter guide story on Christina Corpus here.

Craving a new voice in Peninsula dining?

Sign up for the Peninsula Foodist newsletter.

Sign up now
Leah Worthington
 
Leah Worthington, a Menlo Park native, joined the Redwood City Pulse in 2021. She covers everything from education and climate to housing and city government. Previously she worked as the online editor for California magazine in Berkeley and co-hosts a podcast. Se habla español! Read more >>

Follow AlmanacNews.com and The Almanac on Twitter @almanacnews, Facebook and on Instagram @almanacnews for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Stay informed on important law enforcement news. Sign up for our FREE daily Express newsletter.

Voter guide: Sheriff Carlos Bolanos says as incumbent he's the 'most qualified person' for the job

by / Redwood City Pulse

Uploaded: Tue, May 10, 2022, 11:01 am

Growing up a first-generation American in San Francisco, Carlos Bolanos knew he would have to carve his own path.

"My parents immigrated from Nicaragua," he said. "They didn't know anything about SATs or anything of that sort. So I kind of had to figure it out on my own."

Only in his senior year of high school, when he started feeling the pressure and expectations of adulthood, did Bolanos consider a career in law enforcement. He liked the idea of working in the field, and the excitement of the job appealed to him. And, as he said, "I thought law enforcement would be an honorable profession where I can make a difference."

Now, more than 40 years later, he's in the midst of his first reelection campaign for San Mateo County Sheriff, a position he's held for almost six years. In a contentious race against Sheriff's Capt. Christina Corpus, Bolanos is running a campaign that emphasizes his extensive law enforcement experience and his accomplishments as the incumbent sheriff.

Yet, when given the opportunity, Bolanos has taken jabs at his opponent.

When a news article outed Corpus' husband for having a tattoo of a confederate flag, Bolanos criticized her in an Instagram post.

"It is frankly shocking that Christina Corpus would try to pretend that the Confederate flag has another meaning than exactly what it is - a sign of racism and white supremacy," Bolanos said in his post. "It's less surprising that she would try to cast blame on others in light of this revelation."

Corpus dismissed the claim and described it as "mudslinging" and a distraction from the larger issues.

"It's a smear campaign," she said. "Why aren't people asking the sheriff about things that have happened under his leadership?"

Bolanos's platform is centered around what he calls "public safety first for all," which he hopes to achieve by strengthening community relationships and transparency, upgrading policing technology, reducing recidivism and prioritizing officer wellness.

Describing himself as "the most qualified person to continue to lead the Sheriff's Office," Bolanos said that he has "extensive experience not only in leading law enforcement agencies and keeping our communities safe, but also in building relationships with the communities that we serve.

"I am running for reelection because I want to continue the outstanding work my people are doing," he said.

Path to policing

Becoming sheriff was never a goal of Bolanos's.

After setting his sights on law enforcement, he completed a two-year degree in criminology at City College, before going on to earn his bachelor's in economics from the University of San Francisco and ultimately his master's in public administration from California State University, East Bay.

Then, in the late '70s, as a green patrol officer with the Palo Alto Police Department, he began to dream of rising to the ranks of police chief. At the department, he served as a detective, sergeant and lieutenant, before accepting the role of police captain for the City of Salinas in 1991.

Three years later, at the age of 35, he fulfilled his ambition when he was appointed police chief for the Redwood City Police Department. As chief, a position that he held for 12 years until becoming San Mateo County undersheriff in 2007, Bolanos established the local Police Athletic League (now Police Activities League or PAL) as a way to keep kids out of trouble by engaging them in sports instead. What started as a small operation in a downtown storefront soon grew to include summer camps, field trips and cultural events. Redwood City's PAL, which turned 25 in 2019 and will officially mark the occasion in May, has served a total of 15,000 children and youth so far, mainly in the Latinx community, according to the organization's website.

In 2016, then-Sheriff Greg Munks announced his early retirement, cutting his four-year term short by two years. Facing an imminently vacant sheriff's position, the County Board of Supervisors was tasked with deciding how to proceed, either by appointing then-Undersheriff Bolanos or by opening the process to other candidates through election or appointment. In a letter to the board, representatives Anna Eshoo and Jackie Speier advocated for the latter, recommending "a decision making process that is absent a perception of a pre-ordained outcome."

Ultimately Bolanos was appointed in a 3-2 vote, with Supervisors Dave Pine and Carole Groom dissenting. He was officially elected in 2018 with just over 60% of the vote.

Since then, Bolanos has helped expand the Sheriff's Activities League (SAL), most notably in the opening of a new 2,000-square foot space in Half Moon Bay in December 2021. He has also created new programming for inmates of county correctional facilities, including launching an Acute Stabilization Unit for those experiencing severe mental health issues, opening a Maple Street Correctional Center Family Reunification Unit to help reconnect inmates with their loved ones and implementing video services for remote visitation.

"One of the differences between a sheriff's office and a police department is, of course, we run the correctional facilities," Bolanos said. "And I think it's critical that we do everything we can for the people that are in our care and custody, to make them better when they come out than when they came in."

Bolanos also champions a community policing philosophy, which he said is best demonstrated through the department's engagement efforts, including hosting "coffee with a deputy," "shop with a cop," food and clothing drives, as well as continuing the Community Alliance to Revitalize Our Neighborhoods (CARON) program to serve residents of North Fair Oaks and unincorporated coastal regions. He also launched the Asian American Pacific Islander Liaison Program with Millbrae Deputy Jimmy Chung to address safety concerns among, and prevent hate crimes against the AAPI community.

One of his main goals, he said, is "working in partnership and collaboration with the community that we serve to make sure that their needs are getting met and that we're listening to them."

One of the best examples of this approach, he added, was his decision to end release transfer requests to the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Until November 2021, Bolanos collaborated with ICE by voluntarily transferring former inmates to immigration custody, a practice permitted but not required by Senate Bill 54, the California Values Act, and highly criticized by local advocates. In 2020, the Sheriff's Office reported they released 15 immigrants to ICE, which accounted for 62% of all Bay Area transfers and more than any other individual county.

"One of the things I have done to increase trust between my office and the community is end all cooperation with ICE. I listened to the community, I heard their concerns and I acted," Bolanos told the Pulse.

Opponents have noted that Bolanos could, at any time, reverse his decision. When asked if that's something he would consider, he said that he doesn't intend to cooperate with ICE in the future.

"It's a final decision unless something dramatically changes," he said. However, he added that he agreed with the nature of the law and was "still concerned about serious and violent criminals being released back to the community."

Keeping the county safe

The past few years have marked a significant shift in public perception of law enforcement, something Bolanos is well aware of.

In light of heightened awareness of police brutality as well as growing movements to defund the police, law enforcement officers nationwide are being forced to reckon with their role and image in the public.

Bolanos said he intends to "address that shift by responding to the community's needs and being as transparent as possible." To that end, he said he has updated the department's Use of Force policy, created a Transparency Portal and hosted community events.

"I am also open to creating a community oversight committee that will be able to provide input on how my office can continue to build positive relationships with the communities we serve," he said.

The Sheriff's Office amended its Use of Force policy in the wake of public outcry surrounding three fatal incidents during the year prior.

Following the October 2018 killing of Chinedu Valentine Okobi, a 36-year-old Black man who was stopped by sheriff's deputies while walking in Millbrae and died after being Tasered, beaten and pepper sprayed, the sheriff's office—at the request of the Board of Supervisors—participated in a study session on Tasers and use of force. The sheriff's office presented a revised policy, which incorporated recommendations from the American Civil Liberties Union and emphasized communication and deescalation, implicit bias training and expansion of the Psychiatric Emergency Response Team. The ACLU, which reviewed the draft policy, wrote in a letter to county officials that some aspects of the policy didn't go far enough, adding that the policy includes language that could soon be outdated, permitting deadly force when a deputy "reasonably believes the suspect poses an imminent threat."

"There is never any room for excessive force," said Bolanos, adding that he was always taught to use the least force possible. Still, he added, "It is the job, where, unfortunately, sometimes force must be used. It's not a pleasant thing for a law enforcement officer. You know, we're human beings too, and it can be quite scary and stressful."

Bolanos acknowledged that public trust in law enforcement has been shaken in recent years and said that part of his responsibility as sheriff is to rebuild those relationships.

"As a law enforcement professional, I have to be open and willing to have those discussions with the various groups and members of the community," he said. Bolanos said he looked forward to sitting down with Fixin' San Mateo County, a local organization working to create civilian oversight of the sheriff's office and establish a county inspector general, to discuss ways of increasing transparency and bringing in new perspectives.

Though he welcomed their input, he added, "I don't really like the term oversight because I think it's misleading for everybody. I don't see a model where a group of residents is going to tell me necessarily what to do."

Touting San Mateo County as "one of the safest counties in the state," Bolanos said that ultimately his number one priority is to coordinate with all of the county's police and criminal justice departments to keep the residents and the peace officers safe.

The pandemic, in concert with rising housing costs in the county, non-competitive salaries/benefits and growing social justice movements, have resulted in more people leaving than entering law enforcement, he said. To address officer fatigue and turnover, Bolanos wants to look into better childcare options, more housing assistance and programs that divert public mental health calls to specialists instead of officers. He also plans to implement the third cycle of what he called "an improved mental health/emotional well-being system" focused specifically on helping officers cope with the stress of "the pandemic, civil unrest, low staffing levels," among other things.

"I'm hoping that people realize that law enforcement is absolutely an honorable profession," he said. "And that we get those candidates coming through the door again."

Bolanos and Corpus were set to face off at a candidate forum on May 12 but Bolanos pulled out.

San Mateo County's next sheriff will be determined by voters during the June 7 election.

Read the voter guide story on Christina Corpus here.

Comments

David Vallerga
Registered user
another community
on May 11, 2022 at 9:51 am
David Vallerga, another community
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 9:51 am

Commenting on publication of Sheriff Bolanos' campaign literature as "content"

The people who know the Sheriff best tend to support Christina Corpus to replace him. She has been endorsed by the ENTIRE Half Moon Bay City Council. The Sheriff's office provides policing for Half Moon Bay. His own department's Deputy Sheriff's Association declined to endorse him; in effect a vote of no confidence.

It is time to thank him for his service and move on to someone better. Christina Corpus for Sheriff!


Carina Merrick
Registered user
another community
on May 11, 2022 at 10:52 am
Carina Merrick, another community
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 10:52 am

Sheriff Bolanos says his campaign is about "public safety first for all." Where was the safety for county resident and father Chinedu Okobi? Did Bolanos' deputies make anyone safer when they tried to stop Mr Okobi for jaywalking, and ended up tasing him to death? Do you feel safe knowing Bolanos felt that no discipline for anyone involved was merited?

He says that ending prisoner transfers to ICE in late 2021 is one of the "best examples" of him listening to the community. The community, including organizations like Faith In Action and San Mateo County Coalition for Immigrant Rights, has been pleading with him for years to stop turning people over to ICE. I and others met with him in 2017 to explain how harmful this practice is. He was adamant that these were bad people and they should be deported. Did he decide he was wrong about that? If so, why not say so? What else changed, other than a close election?

He's also quoted as saying "he looked forward to sitting down with Fixin' San Mateo County” (a local group working for civilian oversight). This is a lie. Sheriff Bolanos has been adamantly opposed to the work for Fixin' San Mateo County (FxSMC) since its inception. I know because I volunteer with them, which I do because I believe transparency is fundamental and transcends any election or office holder. Sheriff Bolanos is so against this that he backed out of a candidate forum he'd already agreed to because he believed, wrongly, that FxSMC was one of the organizers. Even when corrected, he still refused. It’s clear he does not believe in transparency, whether through oversight or something as basic as appearing before voters and answering their questions.

Most telling of all is his statement that "I don't see a model where a group of residents is going to tell me necessarily what to do." Who does Sheriff Bolanos think he works for? Who is he accountable to?

I hope people will look closely at whether Sheriff Bolanos actually believes the things he says.


Hmmm
Registered user
another community
on May 11, 2022 at 12:49 pm
Hmmm, another community
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 12:49 pm

Sheriff Bolanos was caught in that human trafficking bordello sting in Vegas. His shamelessness is shameful.


MenloVoter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on May 11, 2022 at 1:13 pm
MenloVoter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 1:13 pm

"Sheriff Bolanos was caught in that human trafficking bordello sting in Vegas. His shamelessness is shameful."

And the Board of Supervisors refused to discipline him or his boss, Munks, who he was caught in the human trafficking bordello with. He received ZERO discipline. And our DA said to "people who matter" it didn't matter that he was caught. Just goes to show you how corrupt this county is. If you're one of the "people who matter" you can do whatever you want without repercussion. On top of that, knowing about this, the voters of this county elected him to office. Amazing


gtspencer
Registered user
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on May 11, 2022 at 2:58 pm
gtspencer, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 2:58 pm

The people who know the Sheriff best tend to support Christina Corpus to replace him. She has been endorsed by the ENTIRE Half Moon Bay City Council. The Sheriff's office provides policing for Half Moon Bay. His own department's Deputy Sheriff's Association declined to endorse him; in effect a vote of no confidence.

And they didn't back her because she was too scared to answer some basic questions. As for being endorsed by HMD city council that's like being endorsed by the island of misfit toys.


Clevinger
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 11, 2022 at 6:55 pm
Clevinger, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 11, 2022 at 6:55 pm

It’s rare that an incumbent sheriff in San Mateo County faces an opponent. They tend to bow out.

Superintendent Don Horsley, who’s about to be term-limited off of the Board of Supervisors, ran unopposed for sheriff in 1993, 1998 and 2003.

His successor, Greg Munks, was Horsley’s undersheriff, the second-in-command. As sheriff, Munks was re-elected twice and faced opposition only once, by a write-in candidate, a former deputy sheriff, who garnered less than 2% of the vote.

Munks retired in 2016, whereupon the supervisors, in a move that was decried in a letter co-authored by congresswomen Jacquie Speier and Anna Eshoo, voted 3-2 not to have an election but instead to appoint Bolanos, who was then Munks’ undersheriff.

When election time rolled around in 2018, Bolanos then could run as an incumbent, with the advantages that come with that status. He did have a potentially formidable opponent in deputy sheriff Mark Melville, but Bolanos won with 60% of the vote.

Just for context, the current county elections officer, Mark Church, was previously a supervisor; Supervisor Warren Slocum was previously the county elections officer; and Horsley, as already noted, graduated to supervisor from the position of sheriff. Each of those positions includes a six-figure annual pension.

If there’s any county department that needs a new broom, it’s the Sheriff’s Office. They give lip service to transparency in government. The ongoing in-voters-faces musical chairs with county position of power is reprehensible.

Bolanos has never suffered consequences from his 2007 escapade with Munks in Las Vegas, when local police found them at an illegal brothel. The two of them were detained but not charged. Once back in town, they refused to answer questions. And they got away with it.

I don’t know anything about Ms. Corpus, but a vote for her would likely be a rare and necessary vote against the good-ol’-boy mutual-admiration society that befouls our county government.


Hmmm
Registered user
another community
on May 12, 2022 at 12:09 pm
Hmmm, another community
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 12:09 pm

Thank you Clevenger and MenloVoter for your informative comments. To add to the history, Munks and Bolanos both were at Palo Alto Police Department earlier in their careers. IIRC Munks grew up in Palo Alto. He worked as a detective, including the sex crimes unit and trained the volunteers for the rape crisis center. He divorced and married into the influential Lane publishing family. He career took on an upwards trajectory.


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on May 12, 2022 at 3:57 pm
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 3:57 pm

Have any of the San Mateo Supervisors endorsed Christina Corpus?


gtspencer
Registered user
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on May 12, 2022 at 6:09 pm
gtspencer, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 6:09 pm

Have any of the San Mateo Supervisors endorsed Christina Corpus?

Nope and neither did the mayor and city council of the city she works in. That should tell you something. She's also not a "police chief" she's just a captain....another of her many lies from a "sheriff you can trust" lol


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on May 12, 2022 at 7:42 pm
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 7:42 pm

I see the entire Half Moon Bay City council endorsed her.. And she wasn't in a brothel that had underaged trafficked girls in Las Vegas!!! Good enough for me


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on May 12, 2022 at 7:43 pm
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on May 12, 2022 at 7:43 pm
Millbrae voter
Registered user
another community
on May 13, 2022 at 2:59 am
Millbrae voter , another community
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 2:59 am

“Nope and neither did the mayor and city council of the city she works in. That should tell you something. She's also not a "police chief" she's just a captain....another of her many lies from a "sheriff you can trust" lol“

Baloney Schneider from Millbrae endorses her and the 3 others on council are “those who matter” like wagstaffe lovingly refers to. Political insiders like oliva of SAMCAR and the realtors who were front running fundraisers and boosters for Bolanos. All due respect these so called leaders of the community corpus polices are part of the problem


MenloVoter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on May 13, 2022 at 7:31 am
MenloVoter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 7:31 am

gtspencer:

of course none of the board of supervisors endorsed her. She's not one of "those that matter". The corruptocrats in this county always close ranks.

As Holly said, she didn't get caught in a human trafficking house of prostitution, Bolanos did. He then lied about who he was when he was arrested until he and Munks could get ahold of the president of the deputy sheriffs association. Who was then ordered by Munks to keep his mouth shut. Not long after that he was promoted. Welcome to San Mateo County, the most corrupt county in California. Corpus not getting caught in a whorehouse is good enough for me. Bolanos is just another corrupt San Mateo County politician. It's time for a change.


Bill
Registered user
another community
on May 13, 2022 at 12:10 pm
Bill, another community
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 12:10 pm

Christina Corpus was promoted by Sheriff Bolanos as the Chief of Sheriff services in Millbrae. During her time there she has improved citizen safety through the use of license plate readers that recently arrested a man who had assaulated a woman in Redwood City. She has also improved community participation and citizen engagement through relationship building between sheriff deputies and the community. Officers are on the streets with citizens to learn and know the Millbrae community. The CARON program was created due to Christine's hard work, not anything the Sheriff created or participated with. Christina helped bring the additional programming to strengthn the relationships between the deputies and the immigrant community at a time when the Sheriff was ignoring appeals from the community, and turning immigrant people over to the federal government's ICE agency for deportation!
Christina Corpus has sustained her professionalism and achieved advanced educational degrees in law enforcement during her more than 20 years of experience working in the San Mateo County Sheriff's office. During that time she endured stereotyping, harrassment, discrimination due to her gender in a male dominated public agency. Christina is now asking for your vote to become the first woman Sheriff in San Mateo County history! Let's support our democracy with a strong woman leading our law enforcement services!

Bill Newell


Dave Boyce
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 13, 2022 at 1:12 pm
Dave Boyce, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 1:12 pm

I was an Almanac reporter for 18 years, and crime was one of my regular beats. My stories required contact with police departments in Menlo Park and Atherton and the Sheriff's Office, which provides its services to Portola Valley, Woodside and unincorporated areas such as West Menlo Park.

While the Blue Wall of Silence did show itself occasionally at the Menlo Park PD, it was nothing compared to the persistent policy-driven stonewalling from the Sheriff's Office.

Walking the halls of the current SO headquarters is, in a word, claustrophobic. They do need a new facility.

Interviews with the SO were always a chore. When a publicly funded institution doggedly limits press contacts to a spokesperson, that's not an indicator of transparency in government. (The Menlo Park PD and its accessible and forthright contact was an exception to this maxim when I was reporting.)

It's appropriate, in my opinion, to say that the everyday vibe the SO gave off was incestuous. If that's changed, I'd be quite surprised.


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on May 13, 2022 at 2:34 pm
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 2:34 pm

Thank you for your insights, Mr. Boyce. Unfortunately, the Sheriff's office knows it can stonewall the press because DA Wagstaffe will always cover for them.


gtspencer
Registered user
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on May 13, 2022 at 5:15 pm
gtspencer, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 5:15 pm

Bill Newell if you believe all the stuff then you have been lied to like the rest of her followers.


Westbrook
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 13, 2022 at 5:58 pm
Westbrook, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 5:58 pm

Everything else should be deliberated.

The Las Vegas episode, the endorsements, releasing illegal immigrants. etc.

I'm not for one or the other,

but Can someone tell me why she is a better candidate Just Because she is a Woman?

That's like saying Bolanos is a better candidate because he is a man.

You cant have it just one way.


Menlo Voter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on May 13, 2022 at 6:32 pm
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 6:32 pm

gtspencer:

not a "follower" of Corpus, just an anti-corrupt Sheriff. I'm betting you're a deputy. Do you think for a minute if you were caught by the FBI in a brothel featuring underage girls, lied about who you were and then finally coughed up who you were that you wouldn't have been disciplined? Unlike Bolanos , the dirt bag, you know damn well you would have been disciplined. But Bolanos? Nope.

Think about it. You are supporting a pervert. A man that went to a brothel that featured UNDER AGE GIRLS. That's the kind of man you want running the SMCSD?


Menlo Voter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on May 13, 2022 at 6:33 pm
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on May 13, 2022 at 6:33 pm

Westbrook:

she's a better candidate because she's not Bolanos.


gtspencer
Registered user
Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
on May 14, 2022 at 2:53 pm
gtspencer, Menlo Park: Menlo Oaks
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 2:53 pm

lol Bill which one of her campaign people gave you this blurb:

Christina Corpus has sustained her professionalism and achieved advanced educational degrees in law enforcement during her more than 20 years of experience working in the San Mateo County Sheriff's office. During that time she endured stereotyping, harrassment, discrimination due to her gender in a male dominated public agency. Christina is now asking for your vote to become the first woman Sheriff in San Mateo County history! Let's support our democracy with a strong woman leading our law enforcement services!

She endured discrimination and harassment, but managed to get promoted to Captain........ Guess she should have made a formal complaint way back when....but then it's all lies just like everything she says...


Thoughtful
Registered user
Atherton: other
on May 14, 2022 at 3:18 pm
Thoughtful, Atherton: other
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 3:18 pm

This issue comes up every few years when there is an election. A challenger, usually from within the sheriff's department, runs against Munks or Bolanos. The are ostracized and threatened. They don't (can't) win.

The same group of people point out Bolanos was caught in an underage brothel in Las Vegas with Munks and suffered no discipline. They point out DA Wagstaffe even said it was nothing to people who matter. Yes, an awful episode of bad behavior and cronyism by them both.

The same group of people point out Bolanos (or Munks, or fill in the blank) won't discipline deputies who behave badly. Duh. Show me a sheriff or police chief who does, at least in California. There's nothing unique about this in regards to Bolanos, as disappointing as it may be.

Bolanos won't tolerate civilian review of his department and authority. No kidding. No one will who has a choice, and, unfortunately, he has been given that choice by the Board of Supervisors.

As much as I don't like how Bolanos has behaved, or how he deals with officer misconduct, the question most San Mateo County residents will wind up asking is which candidate will keep them safer. I might even have to begrudgingly admit that is Bolanos in this election.

The type of reform we need unfortunately won't come from a San Mateo County sheriff's election. Laws need to change to hold law enforcement more accountable. A good start would be eliminating qualified immunity, which basically says that even officers who break the law can't be held civilly accountable. If police departments and sheriff's departments suffer actual consequences for misdeeds, consequences that the city or country have to pay for, reforms will come.

The problem is, in an election, the type of (mis-) behavior Bolanos has engaged in against select individuals doesn't affect how the electorate at large views him.


Menlo Voter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on May 14, 2022 at 7:53 pm
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 7:53 pm

"The problem is, in an election, the type of (mis-) behavior Bolanos has engaged in against select individuals doesn't affect how the electorate at large views him."

Yep, the sheeple of SMC just keep electing the same corrupt individuals throughout the county government. Accountability for the Sheriffs Dept isn't going to change that dynamic. Welcome to San Mateo County, the most corrupt county in California.


Menlo Voter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on May 14, 2022 at 7:54 pm
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 7:54 pm

gtspencer:

do you have a defense for the pervert you support?


Dave Boyce
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 14, 2022 at 11:44 pm
Dave Boyce, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 11:44 pm
Dave Boyce
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 14, 2022 at 11:48 pm
Dave Boyce, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 14, 2022 at 11:48 pm

Thoughtful has a point about the inevitability of incumbents being reelected, and so does GTSpencer about the job of keeping us safe.


Bill
Registered user
another community
on May 15, 2022 at 1:45 am
Bill, another community
Registered user
on May 15, 2022 at 1:45 am

To Mr. Boyce, and whomever GT Spencer is(?),

I do not see any substantive point being made how the current Sheriff is keeping us safe. Tell the family of Chinedu Okobi, a father and county resident, how the Sheriff kept their family member safe. Did the Sheriff's deputies keep us safer after they tried to stop Mr. Okobi from jaywalking across a street and ended up tasing him to death?!? Do you feel safe knowing the Sheriff believed no one involved in this county citizen's tasing death merited any discipline?!?
Many of the comments about the current Sheriff have been about his lack of transparency, something fundamental in our government if you care to keep our democracy. Recently the Sheriff chose not to participate in a Voters Forum he had previously committed to attend. How do you trust your Sheriff when he is not willing to stand before the voters to answer their questions?


JR
Registered user
another community
on May 15, 2022 at 1:47 pm
JR, another community
Registered user
on May 15, 2022 at 1:47 pm

Bill:

It is my understanding that several co-sponsors of the Thrive forum were active supporters, endorsers, and/or contributors of Christina Corpus’ campaign (Fixin San Mateo, Millbrae Anti Racist Coalition, and the San Mateo County Immigration coalition to name a few). Per Thrive “the purpose of the candidate forum is to give all candidates for Sheriff the opportunity to introduce themselves to voters and present their positions on the most pressing issues. It is a non-partisan event that is intended to help inform the electorate, and not to endorse any candidate or otherwise influence the outcome of the election.”

When Carlos Bolanos expressed his concern as to whether Thrive would be able to host a fair and impartial forum due to the involvement of some organizations actively opposing his candidacy, Thrive removed Fixin San Mateo from the forum flyer on the Thrive website and the Thrive spokesperson responded insisting Fixin was never a co-sponsor and Millbrae ARC would have no role in the forum. When Sheriff Bolanos shared with the Thrive spokesperson a screenshot of the original flyer posted on Millbrae ARC’s facebook page prominently displaying Fixin and Millbrae ARC as co-sponsors, he heard crickets. No response or explanation from Thrive. Not coincidentally, Millbrae Arc’s Facebook page was switched to private the same day. When Thrive was contacted by a journalist about a statement made by Sheriff Bolanos, Thrive did not respond to the journalists request for comment.

This all raises the question, who is not being transparent here?

Mike Kelly, the founder of Millbrae ARC and co-sponsor of the Thrive forum attended the Board of Supervisors meeting in March. During public comment he promoted the upcoming Thrive forum and then in the same breath went on to attack Carlos Bolanos’ character and ask the board to withdraw their endorsement of Carlos. Not very smart of him. I’m not sure he understands what a fair and impartial candidate forum means.


Clevinger
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 17, 2022 at 7:03 pm
Clevinger, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 17, 2022 at 7:03 pm

The dynamics repeatedly working against challengers to an incumbent sheriff remind me of how disarming it was to confront a dragon in Game of Thrones. You end up having to admit that you got nothin'.

The intimidating “gaze” of the Sheriff’s Office can be debilitating. Because it’s not just the sheriff doing the gazing. At the 2018 debate, at least 10 deputies lined one outer aisle of the room, radiating the confidence of a squad on a mission, their dress-blue uniforms a departure from the usual khaki, their military deportment — a phalanx, in a word — accompanied by the slightest of no-nonsense smiles. In short, a psychological force to be reckoned with. 

We voters are ostensibly thinking people here in San Mateo County. We know of the vapid morals of some of these candidates and incumbents, their shabby pasts, their shamelessness. We hear their blather and platitudes. And yet we elect them and reelect them because … why?

That threat of the dragon’s fire, that’s a problem.

The more things change in San Mateo County government ...


Clevinger
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on May 27, 2022 at 7:10 pm
Clevinger, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on May 27, 2022 at 7:10 pm

I probably made a mistake when I said that retired county supervisors receive a six-figure pension.

I looked up the pension for former supervisor Rich Gordon, who served for 13 years (three terms plus a fraction of a term at the start). His 2020 supervisor's pension, according to Transparent California, was $59,174. So it's likely that Church's and Horsley's supervisory pensions will be in that ballpark -- though Horsley received $279,830 in pension money in 2020, presumably from his years as sheriff. That's in addition to his $171,387 total benefits as county supervisor that year.

The current sheriff was paid $529,283 in total benefits in 2020 and received $193,161 in pension money. Transparent California sources that money from the city of Redwood City.

Former county elections officer Warren Slocum in 2020 received $173,815 in pension funds on top of $158,636 in total benefits as a supervisor, per Transparent California.

Whew, that's a lot of money.


Dave Boyce
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Jun 4, 2022 at 9:31 pm
Dave Boyce, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on Jun 4, 2022 at 9:31 pm

One further comment on the way things were done in the Sheriff's Office when I was reporting for The Almanac.

I needed to interview a deputy for a story on bicyclists and stop signs. A spokesperson's one-step-removed answers would not do for this story. So they arranged for me to meet with a deputy at the headquarters.

I want to note that this was not a story involving deputy misbehavior or any hint of malfeasance. The topic was bicyclists and their on-again off-again off-again, off-again, off-again, off-again, etc. relationship with stop signs.

I arrived for the interview, was shown to an empty conference room, then met with the deputy ... and the SO spokesperson, also a deputy! In authoritarian societies, people auditing interviews listening for off-message answers are called minders. The sheriff -- he's the one who sets the policies -- provided us with a minder, the deputy and I, for a conversation about bicyclist behavior at stop signs.

I remember asking the deputy, with the spox attending to my every word, if, when he rides a bike and stops at a stop sign, he puts a foot on the ground as a signal to drivers. He does not, he said, adding that there's no obligation in California to do that. Significantly slowing forward momentum is enough.

The spox's presence for this interview was ridiculous, but there it was. That's the kind of institutional attitude that puts the lie to claims about fostering transparency in government.


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on Jun 5, 2022 at 6:22 am
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on Jun 5, 2022 at 6:22 am

Thanks, Mr. Boyce. One wonders if the Sheriff's Office policy of having "minders" in the room with a reporter came after Bolanos's involvement in Operation Dollhouse.

Anyone have any idea how Christina Corpus is doing in this race? Does she have any chance? I see she recently did an interview with Chris Hansen, former host of "To Catch a Predator."


Dave Boyce
Registered user
Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Jun 5, 2022 at 7:47 am
Dave Boyce, Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
Registered user
on Jun 5, 2022 at 7:47 am

My memory is not definitive on the timeline for the introduction of a spokesperson by the Sheriff's Office, but it most likely dates from the aftermath of the Las Vegas incident.

The obvious question for reporters -- and one that I don't think had been asked and answered in any satisfactory way -- is the effect on department morale by the silence and absence of apologies on the part of former sheriff Munks and Bolanos.

Were deputies now saying to themselves "we're working in law enforcement for a couple of guys who may have been about to break the law, not to mention damage ties with their families and common human decency?"

Reporters could only speculate to themselves. I would have asked about morale if given the chance.

Had Bolanos and Munks opened up, they might have suffered consequences. Could the Board of Supervisors have countenanced an honest accounting of events and not acted?

(What, if anything, did the supervisors do? That's another important question.)

But despite the vital and essential importance of trust and a clean slate and good government in a democracy, Munks and Bolanos stayed silent. Maybe engaging a department spokesperson offered them a path forward. It was a way to circle the wagons.


Menlo Voter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on Jun 5, 2022 at 8:37 am
Menlo Voter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on Jun 5, 2022 at 8:37 am

"What, if anything, did the supervisors do? That's another important question."

They didn't do a damn thing. Meanwhile, the chief law enforcement agent for the county, Wagstaffe, emailed Munks and told him that to "those that matter", it didn't matter what they'd done. The corruption runs deep in this county.


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on Jun 6, 2022 at 3:32 am
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on Jun 6, 2022 at 3:32 am

Christina Corpus did an event with Tom Perez yesterday. During the Obama administration Perez was head of the Justice department’s Civil Rights Division, where he led the charge against police misconduct. I know for a fact that citizens contacted Perez's office about misconduct in San Mateo Sheriff's office, which included Operation Dollhouse.

Perez did nothing.

Interesting that he has chosen to support Corpus now, however.

Perez was head of DNC and is now running to be Governor of Maryland.


Thoughtful
Registered user
Atherton: other
on Jun 6, 2022 at 8:11 am
Thoughtful, Atherton: other
Registered user
on Jun 6, 2022 at 8:11 am

Let's also remember that although Munks speaks of "15 years ago" and ancient history, prince Andrew suffered far greater consequences for what I think are lesser allegations about something that happened (allegedly) more than 20 years ago.


Thoughtful
Registered user
Atherton: other
on Jun 6, 2022 at 9:59 am
Thoughtful, Atherton: other
Registered user
on Jun 6, 2022 at 9:59 am

Meant to say Bolanos in the comment above, not Munks.


Bill
Registered user
another community
on Jun 6, 2022 at 10:39 am
Bill, another community
Registered user
on Jun 6, 2022 at 10:39 am

Thank-you David Boyce for your comments clarifying how Bolanos has handled transparency. It is/has been known that he really does not have much.

It is sad to learn the comments from others about how corrupt the county
government is/has been. It certainly makes the sheriff's race and the election
of Christina Corpus all the more critical and important.

I only hope the majority of the voters have gained this understanding and appreciation of this election!?!
Corpus for Sheriff, for democracy!


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on Jun 7, 2022 at 2:48 am
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on Jun 7, 2022 at 2:48 am

San Mateo Daily Journal just endorsed Christina Corpus for Sheriff. Didn't it endorse Bolanos in 2018?


Bill
Registered user
another community
on Jun 7, 2022 at 5:56 am
Bill, another community
Registered user
on Jun 7, 2022 at 5:56 am

Yes Holly, I believe you are correct. We will see this time how much the SM Daily Journal's endorsement of Christina Corpus for Sheriff counts. Unfortunately voter turn-out/participation has been significantly low for this election. But that is another serious matter about the future of our democracy....in this case San Mateo County! Perhaps people will read all the previous comments here, heed the concerns and issues, and join in the democratic responsibility of voting!


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on Jun 8, 2022 at 5:19 am
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2022 at 5:19 am

Not all the votes are counted, but it looks like Christina Corpus is the new Sheriff in town.

She was not endorsed by a single San Mateo Board Supervisor. Shameful.


MenloVoter.
Registered user
Menlo Park: other
on Jun 8, 2022 at 7:36 am
MenloVoter., Menlo Park: other
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2022 at 7:36 am

Holly:

I hope this is true as it might mean the voters of San Mateo County are waking up to the corruption in their county. Now if we can just get someone to replace Wagstaffe, we'll be making progress.


Holly L.
Registered user
Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
on Jun 8, 2022 at 8:00 am
Holly L., Menlo Park: Linfield Oaks
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2022 at 8:00 am

It is true, Menlo Voter. Corpus's lead has increased this morning.

I can understand why good ole boy Supervisor Don Horsley endorsed Bolanos , but the fact that Supervisor Dave Pine also endorsed him this year ( as he did four years ago) is disgraceful.

We had hopes for Pine back in 2011 when he was elected. Too bad he doesn't have a spine. He and every other Supervisor who endorsed Bolanos should be voted out.


Thoughtful
Registered user
Atherton: other
on Jun 8, 2022 at 10:18 am
Thoughtful, Atherton: other
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2022 at 10:18 am

Bolanos, like Munks before him and Horsley before him, and like Wagstaffe, is SMC's version of a "made guy" in the Mafia. He's been thought of as untouchable in an election, and the Board of Supervisors gave their endorsements with a view of expediency and self-preservation, not courage, nor who would be the best sheriff.

I too thought a challenger couldn't unseat an incumbent in SMC law enforcement…until now. All the reasons for this, including the threats and harassment the candidates who courageously came before Corpus had to endure, like Mark Melville, couldn't stop Christina Corpus. These predecessors also deserve credit. It wasn't going to happen overnight.

Wow. What an upset. This is a seismic shift in the good ol' boy politics of this county.

Menlo Voter, you are right. Wagstaffe should be next. Remember, there couldn't have been a Carlos Bolanos or a Greg Munks without Wagstaffe.


Hmmm
Registered user
another community
on Jun 8, 2022 at 12:34 pm
Hmmm, another community
Registered user
on Jun 8, 2022 at 12:34 pm

I’m thrilled to see how well Corpus has done. The Supervisors appointing Bolanos as sheriff some years ago still torches my socks. Maybe we really will have change.

And speaking of Wagstaffe…yes he should be next.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.