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Horticulturist, friend of library Timmy Gallagher dies

Marion Timmy Gallagher, a horticulturist and wildflower expert and a longtime Woodside resident, passed away at the age of 99 on July 3.

Gallagher was born in 1919 in Boston, married Peter Gallagher in 1941, and moved to Woodside shortly after her marriage.

She fell in love with California and its landscape, and shared the extensive horticultural knowledge and expertise she developed over the years with the community, according to her friend Tina Dreyer.

Gallagher became a member of the Friends of the Woodside Library and helped run the library back when it was in the Old Firehouse.

When a new library was built in Woodside in 1968, she helped create a California native plant garden containing more than 160 species representing California plant habitats on a half-acre of land behind the building, her friend said.

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She lobbied the town for funds to create the garden and managed it for 30 years, Dreyer said.

She also wrote a monthly horticulture column, "Plants of the wild," for the Country Almanac, as The Almanac was previously known.

In the 1970s, Gallagher began to focus on protecting endangered wildflowers, including a rare native lily in Woodside, and suggested using photographs and drawings of flowers as a national Garden Club of America project, coordinating the project for 145 clubs.

When the Filoli home in Woodside became a property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and open to the public in 1975, Gallagher planned and taught the docent volunteer program, Dreyer said.

She also wrote the text for a coffee table book called "The Gardens of Filoli," and between 1982 and 2004 raised money for Filoli with the Filoli Traveling Program that took members to several showcase gardens worldwide.

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Gallagher was awarded the Garden Club of America's National Achievement Award in 1982 for her work at Filoli and for several projects to encourage good ecological habits and the preservation of native plants, Dreyer said.

She was preceded in death by her husband and her son, Peter Duncan Gallagher, and is survived by daughters Lee Gallagher of Woodside and Noel Dennehy of Atlanta. She has five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

There will be no memorial service at her request, Dreyer said.

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Horticulturist, friend of library Timmy Gallagher dies

by Rick Radin / Almanac

Uploaded: Tue, Jul 30, 2019, 10:30 am

Marion Timmy Gallagher, a horticulturist and wildflower expert and a longtime Woodside resident, passed away at the age of 99 on July 3.

Gallagher was born in 1919 in Boston, married Peter Gallagher in 1941, and moved to Woodside shortly after her marriage.

She fell in love with California and its landscape, and shared the extensive horticultural knowledge and expertise she developed over the years with the community, according to her friend Tina Dreyer.

Gallagher became a member of the Friends of the Woodside Library and helped run the library back when it was in the Old Firehouse.

When a new library was built in Woodside in 1968, she helped create a California native plant garden containing more than 160 species representing California plant habitats on a half-acre of land behind the building, her friend said.

She lobbied the town for funds to create the garden and managed it for 30 years, Dreyer said.

She also wrote a monthly horticulture column, "Plants of the wild," for the Country Almanac, as The Almanac was previously known.

In the 1970s, Gallagher began to focus on protecting endangered wildflowers, including a rare native lily in Woodside, and suggested using photographs and drawings of flowers as a national Garden Club of America project, coordinating the project for 145 clubs.

When the Filoli home in Woodside became a property of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and open to the public in 1975, Gallagher planned and taught the docent volunteer program, Dreyer said.

She also wrote the text for a coffee table book called "The Gardens of Filoli," and between 1982 and 2004 raised money for Filoli with the Filoli Traveling Program that took members to several showcase gardens worldwide.

Gallagher was awarded the Garden Club of America's National Achievement Award in 1982 for her work at Filoli and for several projects to encourage good ecological habits and the preservation of native plants, Dreyer said.

She was preceded in death by her husband and her son, Peter Duncan Gallagher, and is survived by daughters Lee Gallagher of Woodside and Noel Dennehy of Atlanta. She has five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

There will be no memorial service at her request, Dreyer said.

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