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The Food Party!

By Laura Stec

E-mail Laura Stec

About this blog: I've been attracted to food for good and bad reasons for many years. From eating disorder to east coast culinary school, food has been my passion, profession & nemesis. I've been a sugar addict, a 17-year vegetarian, a food and en...  (More)

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Now Playing - Your Dinner!

Uploaded: Mar 26, 2015

The Food Party! is off doing some extended research into a few topics for the spring. This includes a feature of the recent Future Chefs Competition for the Palo Alto elementary and middle schools, an Earth Day piece on corporate food service and food source integrity and transparency, a sit down with Dr. Eugene Cordero and the Green Ninja Project, and a gutsy look at women who dare to sit at a bar and enjoy a drink??.

ALONE.

(If you happen to be one of those rare birds, I'd love to interview you. Please contact me at laurastec@mac.com.)

So today's blog is just a short and sweet shout-out for the Food and Farm Festival, coming to town April 17 - 19th. Sponsored by Bi-Rite Market of San Francisco, it offers 3 days of films and fun. All proceeds benefit 18 Reasons, a San Francisco-based non-profit that offers hands-on food experiences to all Bay Area residents.

Here's a few of the films that will be shown:

Coconut Nose to Tail (Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine, 4 minutes) No part of the coconut goes to waste in this entertaining short.

Facing Climate Change: Potato Farmers (Ben Drummond and Sarah Joy Steele, 5 min) John O'Conner grew Idaho potatoes where they had never been grown before. Then the state bought his water rights, and land that once grew thirsty crops is now providing wind energy

Lonche (Claire Weissbluth, 2013, 20 minutes) Travel California's backroads with two very different taco trucks: one serving office workers in Silicon Valley, the other serving strawberry and raspberry pickers in the Pajaro Valley.

Raising Shrimp (Sarah Curry, Fish Navy Films, 2014, 60 minutes) Shrimp is our most popular seafood item (we consume a billion pounds a year). But 90% of our shrimp is imported, and most of that is farmed, not wild caught. Filmmaker Ted Caplow and scientist Andy Danylchuk search for a seafood we can all believe in. Ultimately, they find hope in a most unlikely place, as their journey makes a sharp turn into modern agricultural science.


For more info and the complete schedule, visit their website.



"There's a growing conversation about food; we want to know what we are eating, whether it's healthy, where it comes from, who made or grew it, and if it's sustainable. The food-consciousness movement is a powerful force, and we feel it needs a creative outlet."
- Food and Farm Film Fest

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