Arts

Musicians experiment with online collaborations in Stanford's Quarantine Sessions series

March 21 edition of the concert series features artists both local and international

Stanford's "Quarantine Sessions" performances bring together musicians and artists in the U.S. and Europe for online collaborations. Courtesy Stanford Arts

In the past year, online concerts and shows have become an important way to keep the performing arts alive, and, well, performing. Though it will never be the same as experiencing an in-person concert, the virtual world also brings with it some silver linings, and the Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA)'s "Quarantine Sessions: A Distributed Electroacoustic Network Improvisation" has been making the most of them. The latest installment of the series will be livestreamed Sunday, March 21, 1-2 p.m.

The series brings together musicians and artists in the United States and Europe in collaborations and experiments to find new ways to bring online performances to audiences. The Quarantine Sessions connect musicians from various locations and broadcast performances live with audio and video feeds from each site. The performances use free, open-source technology.

Sunday's performance features Bay Area musicians Constantin Basica, Chris Chafe and Fernando Lopez-Lezcano, as well as Henrik von Coler and Klaus Scheuermann, who are both based in Berlin, and Juan Parra in Ghent, Belgium. Special guest performers are poet, playwright and multidisciplinary artist Bonnie Wai-Lee Kwong, in Menlo Park, and scholar, musician, multimedia technologist, audio engineer and maker Cecilia Wu, who's currently based in Denver.

For more information, visit ccrma.stanford.edu.

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Musicians experiment with online collaborations in Stanford's Quarantine Sessions series

March 21 edition of the concert series features artists both local and international

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Thu, Mar 18, 2021, 6:54 pm

In the past year, online concerts and shows have become an important way to keep the performing arts alive, and, well, performing. Though it will never be the same as experiencing an in-person concert, the virtual world also brings with it some silver linings, and the Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA)'s "Quarantine Sessions: A Distributed Electroacoustic Network Improvisation" has been making the most of them. The latest installment of the series will be livestreamed Sunday, March 21, 1-2 p.m.

The series brings together musicians and artists in the United States and Europe in collaborations and experiments to find new ways to bring online performances to audiences. The Quarantine Sessions connect musicians from various locations and broadcast performances live with audio and video feeds from each site. The performances use free, open-source technology.

Sunday's performance features Bay Area musicians Constantin Basica, Chris Chafe and Fernando Lopez-Lezcano, as well as Henrik von Coler and Klaus Scheuermann, who are both based in Berlin, and Juan Parra in Ghent, Belgium. Special guest performers are poet, playwright and multidisciplinary artist Bonnie Wai-Lee Kwong, in Menlo Park, and scholar, musician, multimedia technologist, audio engineer and maker Cecilia Wu, who's currently based in Denver.

For more information, visit ccrma.stanford.edu.

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