Town Square

Post a New Topic

Coroner confirms girl was killed by truck

Original post made on Jul 19, 2013

The San Mateo County coroner Friday confirmed that a 16-year-old girl was fatally struck by a fire truck at the San Francisco International Airport during the response to the crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 earlier this month.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Friday, July 19, 2013, 11:08 AM

Comments (21)

Posted by Michael G Stogner, a resident of Atherton: West Atherton
on Jul 19, 2013 at 2:20 pm

This was a tragic accident, First responders and all who helped did an excellent job.

Todays announcement puts to rest the question which had been circulating for days. Now the parents know and its official.


Posted by Srini, a resident of another community
on Jul 19, 2013 at 3:59 pm

Earlier news reports also said that she was at least partially or significantly covered with foam that had been sprayed on the plane. While this is a tragic accident, it is understandable that this fact, along with the chaos at the time, may have rendered this unavoidable. The family will not feel any less of a loss, and the responders will have to live with this, but it was truly an accident.


Posted by gina, a resident of Menlo Park: Stanford Hills
on Jul 19, 2013 at 4:07 pm

there was no excuse for this accident to happen. they say this might have happened when foam covered the ground. come on you going to tell me these people can't see an object in the road before they ran over her. if they can't see what they are driving over then they have no business being called firefighters. they save people not run over people but this truck did shameful.


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Jul 19, 2013 at 4:14 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

Gina - You don't know what you are talking about. Fire suppression foam is DESIGNED to smother things and, unlike water, totally obscures what is beneath it. The first responders were faced with a massive fire and they responded superbly saving many lives. This was an accident and you simply don't have the expertise or credentials to even question that fact.


Posted by SteveC, a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Jul 20, 2013 at 1:07 pm

SteveC is a registered user.

Thank You Peter, Gina needed to be told the facts! It was an accident.


Posted by TwoMars, a resident of Menlo Park: University Heights
on Jul 20, 2013 at 3:35 pm

How could the driver not feel anything when the first tire ran over that girl's body? How could the driver continue driving and running the rest of the tires over that girl's body? I am not sure I am persuaded that there is not even a little neglegance here... It is such a tragedy and so ironic to survive a plane crash but get run over by rescue.


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Jul 20, 2013 at 3:45 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"How could the driver not feel anything when the first tire ran over that girl's body"

This occurred in the unpaved area between the runway and the taxi way which was covered with aircraft and sea wall debris and smothered in foam. There were hundreds of people whose lives were at risk because of the aircraft and aviation fuel fires. Get it?

[Portion removed; please be civil to other posters.]


Posted by Srini, a resident of another community
on Jul 20, 2013 at 3:54 pm

Gina & TwoMars sure know how to second guess the pros. [Portion removed; please be civil to other posters.] Fact is, the chaos, foam, and debris created a perfect storm for this tragic and unavoidable accident. They probably ran over several bumps before running over the girl, some bigger, some smaller. How they suddenly say, "Oh my God, that felt like a person".


Posted by Srini, a resident of another community
on Jul 20, 2013 at 3:55 pm

..........Sorry, meant "How could they possibly say.......


Posted by Menlo Voter, a resident of Menlo Park: other
on Jul 20, 2013 at 8:26 pm

Tell you what Gina and twomars, when you two strap on an oxygen tank and turn outs and go fight fires you can express an opinion about something you obviously know nothing about. You and your ilk are one of the reasons I left law enforcement. Second guessers who haven't a clue about what is actually involved in doing the job. Go get a clue and then you can complain. I'm betting you won't once you do.

Frankly, you two should be ashamed of yourselves. Can you imagine what the driver of that apparatus is feeling right now? It was an ACCIDENT. You've never had one of those have you? Get it?


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Jul 20, 2013 at 8:34 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"Portion removed; please be civil to other posters.]"

Posters who lack understanding and expertise don't deserve civility. What is 'civil' about their uninformed attacks on diligent first responders??????


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Jul 20, 2013 at 8:44 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

How SAD that the editors consider it civil for posters to attack first responders and then delete responses that challenge those posters.


Posted by Donna, a resident of Woodside: other
on Jul 22, 2013 at 12:31 am

As the daughter of a firefighter I wanted you all to know that I have never heard my Dad complain about how dangerous the job is or the long hours away from his family, or how his heart breaks when a life is lost, or how hard every person in his department is at risk due to someone falling asleep smoking or crashes into another car while driving drunk. He is selfless as they all are when saving our lives. The young lady, Ye Meng Yuan was a hero in her own way helping her friends at the crash site, then stumbled to the debri ridden ground where she was hidden by all the foam. She just happened to be further away than the other victims. The firefighter driving the truck is a hero for the ability to maneuver through all the debri in a critical situation where time is of the essence, and save nearly 200 people from the fuel igniting and losing more lives. Ye Meng Yuan is an angel for giving her life to save others. I have the utmost respect for her and the firefighter for their bravery and heroic contribution in a most tragic situation. To Ye Meng Yuan's family, I would be so proud of her for thinking of others at her own expense. To the firefighter, I thank you for keeping the plane from exploding. I respectfully thank all of the hero's who saved all those lives and for doing a job that most people are afraid to do because of the risks.
It is easy to complain about things but only hurts peoples feelings and causes upset all around. I realized a long time ago that when I was being negative it was because I was unhappy about something in my own life and misery loves company. I wasn't doing any good being miserable so I changed and found out that it takes a little more effort to find the positive in a situation but when you do and you share how you feel then you are making people happy and making a difference in this world.
I for one wouldn't mind hearing the positive that Gina and TwoMars have to say about these selfless hero's.


Posted by Jane, a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Jul 22, 2013 at 12:53 pm

"The young lady, Ye Meng Yuan was a hero in her own way helping her friends at the crash site, then stumbled to the debri ridden ground where she was hidden by all the foam. "

Is this actually what happened? Can you provide the link to where this information has been published? I am sorry for the family's loss, but I thought the young woman was thrown from the plane. It is very sad.


Posted by Mike Keenly, a resident of Menlo Park: Allied Arts/Stanford Park
on Jul 22, 2013 at 1:27 pm

All of the first responders did an incredible job, which likely prevented further loss of life. We should also be thankful that we live in a country where investigations will uncover the truth, no matter how painful the conclusion.


Posted by Hmmm, a resident of another community
on Jul 22, 2013 at 1:52 pm

Absolutely people should be allowed to criticize how this terrible death occurred. It doesn't mean that their criticism is informed. Perhaps if the truck had been better equipped this poor girl wouldn't have been killed this way. Maybe the editors here will update the story w/enough info about how this accident happened so that people can better understand it. This is an example of how technology can save lives & we all must remember this when we grumble about the costs of updating equipment.

First responders know that they can't save everyone, but to actually kill them is unthinkable. I am so sorry for all who are involved.


Posted by POGO, a resident of Woodside: other
on Jul 22, 2013 at 2:56 pm

These fire trucks are 10 feet wide and weigh more than 50 tons. While the view through the front windows is incredible - they are designed that way - they cannot see through foam.

A disaster scene such as airplane crash is completely chaotic and almost impossible to understand. You are driving through a war zone of debris with people running everywhere and mountains of foam all over the place.

While tragic, let's give these first responders the full benefit of the doubt. This was an accident and was clearly unintentional. And given the location of this young woman's seat and the catastrophic fate of others sitting next to her at the rear of the aircraft, I seriously doubt she was running around helping people when she was struck by the truck.


Posted by Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton: Lindenwood
on Jul 22, 2013 at 3:01 pm

Peter Carpenter is a registered user.

"First responders know that they can't save everyone, but to actually kill them is unthinkable."

It is only unthinkable if you do not understand the elements of responding to a disaster and the desire of the first responders to do the greatest good for the greatest number.


Posted by SteveC, a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Jul 22, 2013 at 4:19 pm

SteveC is a registered user.

The Chronicle has an article today about "sensors" which are equipped on some fire trucks. Might be worth upgrading the trucks at SFO. Tragic accident, yes. Hero's, yes. Sad, yes. Think positive, don't be negative on everything


Posted by Bob, a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown
on Jul 22, 2013 at 8:25 pm

While people are entitled to their opinions and while this accident was tragic, unless you've been on the scene of a substantial disaster, as this was, you don't really have any perspective of all that goes on. The last thing a first responder wants is to cause harm. I feel bad for the driver who now has to live with this tragedy.

This accident had all the elements for being much worse.


Posted by ndnorth, a resident of another community
on Jul 23, 2013 at 9:38 am

It's shameful that people lacking the most elementary common sense let alone expertise are being protected from the consequences of their airhead opinions. Their "opinions" are nothing more than a blunt need badmouth those who unlike them save lives and save the lives of many.
The problem is that all has to be explained to them and that's rather difficult because their comprehension is improbable (I am being civil)


If you were a member and logged in you could track comments from this story.

Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

Veggie Grill coming soon to Mountain View's San Antonio Center
By Elena Kadvany | 25 comments | 3,748 views

The Dude Abides
By Laura Stec | 4 comments | 1,559 views

. . . Loved in Spite of Ourselves
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 1,540 views

I Spy
By Cheryl Bac | 4 comments | 434 views

Medical Madness
By Paul Bendix | 0 comments | 402 views