Menlo Park briefs: Construction begins on Santa Cruz sidewalks | March 8, 2017 | Almanac | Almanac Online |

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News - March 8, 2017

Menlo Park briefs: Construction begins on Santa Cruz sidewalks

by Kate Bradshaw

Construction has begun on long-awaited sidewalks on Santa Cruz Avenue bewtween Olive Street and San Mateo Drive in Menlo Park.

Sidewalks will be installed first on the south side of the street (odd-numbered addresses). That is expected to be completed by mid-April.

In the meantime, the walking path on the south side of the road from Olive Street to San Mateo Drive is closed.

Pedestrians are advised to use the crosswalks on both of those cross streets to cross the street and walk on the north side of Santa Cruz Avenue. Bike lanes will remain in operation on both sides of the street.

The whole project is expected to be completed by late September, the city said.

Willow Oaks Park

A community workshop will be held Thursday, March 9, from 6:30 to 8 p.m., at the Arrillaga Family Recreation Center to talk about plans to install bathrooms and renovate the dog park at Willow Oaks Park.

The recreation center is at 601 Laurel St. in the Menlo Park Civic Center.

Go to tinyurl.com/willow443 to respond to a survey on the topic. The deadline to respond is 8 p.m. on March 8.

Goodbye, trees

An application to cut down 39 heritage trees at the Sharon Green apartment complex at 350 Sharon Park Drive in Menlo Park has been approved, according to Public Works Superintendent Brian Henry.

The approval was granted on the condition that two trees be planted to replace each heritage tree removed, and that the majority of the new trees be of a 24-inch box size.

Other conditions: trees and an irrigation system must be installed in the Sharon Road median island, and non-heritage trees that are 13 to 14 inches in diameter must be maintained for four years.

Renewable electricity

Electrical power used by SamTrans and Caltrain in San Mateo County will soon come from 100 percent renewable sources, such as solar, wind and small hydroelectric power. The agencies use electrical power for train signals, stations, bus depots and offices.

The boards of directors for the transportation agencies voted March 1 (SamTrans) and March 2 (Caltrain) to switch from PG&E power to 100 percent renewable electrical energy through a joint powers authority in San Mateo County known as Peninsula Clean Energy.

Peninsula Clean Energy operates as a public energy provider to enable PG&E customers to get electrical energy from renewable sources at rates competitive with PG&E's.

The program will soon become the default electrical energy provider in the county, unless customers choose to stick with PG&E.

The default option will be a 50 percent renewable energy package that's about 5 percent cheaper than PG&E. Users may choose to get 100 percent renewable energy for slightly more than PG&E's current rates.

The transition to renewable sources is expected to be complete by the end of May, according to Peninsula Clean Energy spokesman Dan B. Lieberman.

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