News


St. Raymond School first in academic decathlon

Submitted by Lynn Stieren, teacher at St. Raymond School.

St. Raymond School in Menlo Park and 10 other elementary schools from the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco participated in the annual Academic Junior High Decathlon at St. Pius School in Redwood City on March 1.

Cheered on by parents, classmates, and teachers, the 15-member St. Raymond Academic Decathlon Team finished in first place in the Super Quiz and first place overall, outscoring second-place Notre Dame Elementary School in Belmont, and third-place St. Gabriel School in San Francisco.

St. Raymond School will represent the Archdiocese of San Francisco in April at the State Academic Decathlon in San Bernadino.

In individual events, St. Raymond students Emma Connors, Lesly Duke and Chelsea Dunleavy were awarded gold medals in English, science, and fine arts, respectively; and Sebastian Marshall took the silver medal in current events.

The Academic Junior High Decathlon is a competition for students in grades 6 through 8. There are 10 events. Two are collaborative team efforts a logic quiz with 20 rigorous thinking problems, and a super quiz with 50 multiple-choice questions on five broad academic themes.

The remaining eight events test individual knowledge of the Roman Catholic doctrine, English, literature, science, mathematics, current events, social studies, and fine arts (art and music). Awards are given for individual and team performance, and the winning school team from each geographic diocese competes in a state championship.

The St. Raymond team is made up of Alexis Bundy, Emma Connors, Leslie Duke, Chelsea Dunleavy, Matthew Huo, Rebecca Latham, Margaret Leahy, John Lonergan, Ronan MacRunnels, Sebastian Marshall, Scott Nelson, Christian Powell, Roger Ross, Thaddeus Sison, and Matthew Smithers.

With their adviser, Mr. Patrick Sullivan and the academic coaches, teachers, and parents, the team worked before school, after school and weekends, studying subjects such as science, fine arts, social studies, religion, and literature.

The real "gold," however, could be felt in the fellowship that developed during the hours spent studying together, questioning one another on the subject matter, and learning how to work together as a team.

Comments

There are no comments yet. Please share yours below.

Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Choose a category: *

Since this is the first comment on this story a new topic will also be started in Town Square! Please choose a category that best describes this story.

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

Scott’s Seafood Mountain View to close, reopen as new concept
By Elena Kadvany | 13 comments | 3,961 views

Who Says Kids Don’t Eat Vegetables?
By Laura Stec | 9 comments | 2,051 views

When Grandparents Visit
By Cheryl Bac | 4 comments | 683 views

Having A Hard Time Getting Your Child To Dive Into Their Summer Reading? Take A Trip To Bookopolis…
By Erin Glanville | 0 comments | 592 views

Freshman Blues Don't Mean Wrong College
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 0 comments | 587 views